Tag Archives: japan

Older Photos from Throughout Asia

As I was digging through my Flickr archives today, I noticed that I don’t post very many photos at all here! My Flickr account, small by some standards, just passed 6,000 photos recently. This is a miniscule amount of what I shoot, as I think I have 25,000+ photos in raw/.NEF format on an external hard drive.

Anyway, it’s good now and then to take a look at older shots, especially with my lack of digging out the camera these days. Here is a mix of places and subjects:

Above: Bangkok, Thailand: monks disembark from the Chao Praya Express boat.

Above: Bangkok, where I got stuck in the middle of after-school rush hour. Somewhere near the Chao Praya river.

Above: Ryukyu drum performance in Okinawa, Japan.

Above: Traditional “hanbok” style Korean dresses in Seoul.

Above: Taipei’s Ximending district, sometime around Chinese New Year 2013.

Above: Somewhere in Naha, Okinawa.

Above: Khmer folk dancers in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

Above: Bas relief, Angkor Wat, Siem Reap, Cambodia.

1 Comment

Filed under taiwan2010

Sights of Okinawa’s Streets and People – Okinawa Post 5

Whenever I travel, I find it important to get an idea of what daily life is like in that place. Taiwan, Cambodia, Thailand, Hong Kong, and now Okinawa have given me this experience and it’s ALWAYS different.

Most of these were taken in and around Naha, the financial, social, and economic capital of Okinawa. While I certainly noticed fewer old buildings, there were plenty of cultural gems found only in Japan and in some cases, only in Okinawa.

Heiwa-Dori, the famed shopping street, during the midday. Multiple streets actually intersect in this area, and it is under cover in the style of a Japanese “shopping arcade.”

As with the rest of Asia, you’ll find traditional food everywhere. Okinawa soba, varied types of tofu, sashimi, tempura – it’s pretty limitless – and delicious.

 

Above left: a pachinko parlour named “Monaco.” Above right: this Burger King requires you to take off your shoes upon entrance. Something I’ve never seen, even in Taiwan.

The Naha monorail is a great way to get around the city. Though they only have one line, it covers the important parts of the city – like the airport.

 

Above left: I’m not sure if this place is actually popular with servicemen/women, but I liked the sign. Much of Naha is off-limits to service personnel. Above right: another restaurant. Like Taiwan, it was hard to decide where to eat.

Above: a representative of the Japanese Communist Party (yes, you read that correctly!) announces an upcoming protest. Notice the MV-22 Osprey silhouette - the Japanese are protesting its use by US Marines due to safety issues. I think the restrictions on the aircraft should pass soon, but it was a pretty noticeable symbol.

Vending machines after the rain. I loved the rain in Okinawa – it was always just enough to cool things off and never stormed all day. Vending machines are everywhere.

Ice cream shop, Heiwa-Dori.

A vending machine-controlled restaurant. You order, it prints a ticket, and you get your food. Not a bad idea.

The monorail conductor.

A fortune teller waiting for business in a Naha alleyway.

Orion beer lanterns. Orion beer is a malty beer brewed on the island itself. Similar to most other Asian style lagers.

Old and new on a Naha street.

More old and new. This intrigues me about Asia and I see it all the time in Taiwan, yet never tire of it.

8 Comments

Filed under taiwan2010

Makishi Market, Naha – Okinawa Post 4

Makishi Market is located in a central part of Kokusai Dori Market, located in Naha, Okinawa. This market is much like the ones I’ve seen and taken photos at in Taiwan, though it was attached with restaurants that prepared your food and allowed you to eat your fresh fish as sashimi or a cooked dish.

Leave a comment

Filed under taiwan2010

Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium (沖縄美ら海水族館) – Okinawa Post 2

In the middle of our trip, we went north to Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, home to the second largest aquarium tank in the world. The main tank is by far the most popular attraction and in all honesty, my photos don’t do it justice – perhaps this video by Jon Rawlinson in Vimeo will do a better job. Make sure to watch it in HD:

My favorite shot of the aquarium was of this massive whale shark. Keep in mind that there are not just one, but two of these with plenty of room to move around!

Apparently, the aquarium is of of a few with manta rays:

Of course, there were other exhibits with smaller tanks:

The architecture of the structure itself was a bit fascinating:

…and the natural beauty of the area was pretty amazing:

 

4 Comments

Filed under taiwan2010

Okinawa’s Shuri Castle (首里城) – Okinawa Post 1

Shuri-jo, or 首里城, is a castle located in southern Okinawa which I visited last week while on a trip to the Japanese island. The structure itself is rebuilt, having been used as a Japanese military headquarters during the 1945 battle and subsequently destroyed during the fighting. It dates back to the 14th century, during which it was part of not Japan, but the Ryukyu Kingdom. The Ryukyu culture, which is similar in many ways to Japan through language and culture, played a central role in trade in the region. It was, however, taken over and annexed by the 19th century as Okinawa became Okinawa Prefecture.

1 Comment

Filed under taiwan2010

Spring Scream Night 2: ONC

This is the first of very many Spring Scream posts as I get photos processed, organized, and uploaded to Flickr.  The first band is a Japanese punk group called ONC. They’ve got an old school punk flavor which I prefer – very much along the lines of Rancid, Black Flag, and some other groups who I’ve always liked.

The first image is a repost from the preview, though it was my favorite. I noticed that my images from this set aren’t as great as they could be for two reasons – first, I was enjoying the show. This group was too fun to take too seriously and everyone was having a great time. Second, I hadn’t yet switched to my 35mm prime f/1.8 lens, which forced me to get up close to the stage. I worked on this the next day and really liked the results.

I originally attached the 70-300, thinking I’d need the distance with the crowds. The nice part about this festival, though was the accessibility - it was easy to move around the stage with the 35mm and the images were much, much clearer.

Before I begin, here’s a link to their Reverbnation page.

I made it a point to not forget the drummer – even though I forgot the bassist in this band! Whoops…

Actually, this should be him above. Something about the lead singer’s haircut is photogenic, though…

In retrospect, the wider angle of the 35 had a lot of advantages I just hadn’t seen until pulling it out of my bag – more on that another time.

Leave a comment

Filed under taiwan2010